Who says study music must be boring?

By Audrey Abbate1851 Contributor

A playlist, a background and headphones could be all you need to finish your work.
Photo by Audrey Abbate

Here’s 10 songs that can be found on Apple Music, Spotify, Youtube and Soundcloud to help you get through the rest of the spring semester. Whether it be for studying or simply winding down at the end of the day, these songs are just the right amount of calm.

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Empty Bowls holds auction benefiting Center Street Food Pantry placed

By: Rebecca Osowski1851 Staff


A set of bowls auctioned off at the event made by a community member and glazed by a former student.
By Rebecca Osowski

       The Empty Bowls club held a live event via Zoom to auction off handmade bowls to raise money for the Center Street Food Pantry in Newton on April 15.

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Five-year strategic plan undergoes changes

By Katie PetersCo Editor-In-Chief

Since October, President Michael Alexander, the Senior Management Team, and the Board of Trustees have been working with faculty, professors, students, and other community members to adjust the university’s five-year strategic plan. The Speed of Change Steering Committee was formed in the fall of 2020 to reexamine the current plan, Vision 2022, and make adjustments for a pandemic-enduring University.

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The little things are the big things

By Ruth KehindeDigital Editor 

Lasell graduate Ally Wheeler and Ruth Kehinde share giggles while on a hike.
Photo by Ruth Kehinde

Sometimes when we’re going about our lives, not every day is as perfect as we want it to be. However, regardless of what the day may bring, finding the joy in the little things can go a long way. Little moments have shaped the way my life is today and my perspective along with it. My list is ever-growing, but here are the ones that count. 

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5 perks of LinkedIn for undergraduate students

By Katie Peters Co-Editor-in-Chief

Exploring the Lasell University LinkedIn profile.
Photo by Katie Peters

Spending a significant amount of time and money getting a degree takes a lot of effort. Between late night study sessions and early morning classes, many students hope their work will pay off once they land a job in their field. Of the many ways students are able to showcase their skills, creating a LinkedIn profile is a great way to connect with others professionally, search for jobs and internships, and to create a public resume. 

Continue reading “5 perks of LinkedIn for undergraduate students”

What I wished I knew

By Holly FeolaOpinion Editor

 Holly Feola stands in front of her freshman dorm building, Van Winkle, on move-in day.
Photo by Holly Feola

The time between when a high school senior graduates to when they start college is full of uncertainty. They are likely leaving their hometown or a group of friends they have had for many years. In my case, I graduated from a high school that was in the same school district I was part of since first grade. I knew almost everyone in my grade and the grades above and below me. The concept of enrolling into a new college with people I didn’t know seemed daunting to me. So here are some things I wish I could have told myself: 

  1. It takes time to find your college friends.

During my first year, I struggled with my roommate and making friends. Sometimes it takes being in the right time and place to meet people that truly understand you. I didn’t meet my good friends at Lasell until the end of my first year. 

2. Getting involved on campus would make me feel like I belonged sooner. 

The corny saying “get involved” echoed in my head for a while without really resonating. By getting involved with clubs it helped introduce me to some of the closest friends I have from college. When I became an RA it introduced me to a supportive community filled with great people. Finding a group to involve yourself with can help you feel more connected to others and have a more fulfilling college experience. 

3. I wish I learned how to be more independent before leaving for college. 

Before coming to college I thought of myself as a fairly independent person until I found myself asking others for help or how to do things. I didn’t realize how much I asked of my parents or how much they did for me. Learning how to better handle expenses is an important skill for college life. 

Holly Feola in her room in West Hall on RA move-in day for her junior year.
Photo by Holly Feola

4. I wish I knew to go out to more places and explore. 

Before COVID-19, I wish I went out to different restaurants and places with my friends so I could have some fun memories with them. For months, some places were closed or it just was not possible to go out anymore. There are so many cool places around Lasell in Waltham and in Boston that I still want to check out. For my senior year I’m going to try to make it a goal to go to as many places as I can. 

5. I wish I knew to value my time more in the present. 

Out of all of the wishes on this list the last is the most important. This resonated with me during the pandemic. Instead of dreaming of the future or reminiscing about the past, it is important to engage in the now and seize the opportunities in front of you.

Your World Will Change

By Karissa M. Gaughan1851 Staff 

“4-year-old Karissa Gaughan outside her house in hometown Connecticut”
By Karissa M. Gaughan

Dear Little one,

You’re going to carry burdens you’ll wish you never endured, nevertheless, your perseverance is why you’re here today. You kept your head up, and I’m proud of you.

You’re going to question a lot of things growing up. Preconceptions you’ve made as a child will show to be facades, but this isn’t meant as a trick or an act of deceit. The world is not as soft and caring as Mom tucking you in at night singing ‘You Are My Sunshine’ until you close your innocent eyes. You see, as you grow older, you’ll discover the world around you is what you make of it. It can be cold and scary, but what you have in store is a lifetime filled with adventure and jubilation.

Experience the ammeration of traveling to the islands and seeing clear Pacific waves crash into white sandy beaches. Climb Mount Everest and marvel at the beautiful curves of the land you walk on. Tour the seven wonders of the world, keeping in mind the thoughts of their creators, but create your own original thoughts. Initiate a context with people from backgrounds estranged from yours, and understand the different walks of life around you.

You’ll learn that people are nothing more than stories told from different perspectives. Listening to others’ stories will allow you to be yourself through the acceptance of diversity.

Every story has a beginning, middle and end. This is just your beginning.

Always take the road less traveled,

Love, not so little you.

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