The women behind The Chronicle’s digital content Reply

By Katie PetersArts Editor

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The brains of the operation, Ruth Kehinde and Emily Long. Photo courtesy of Emily Long and Ruth Kehinde.

Managing digital content for a university’s newspaper is no small feat. It takes creativity, patience and communication to do the job effectively. Since March, The 1851 Chronicle has moved completely online, making the job of digital editor that much more crucial. Thanks to the two women that currently hold this job, the transition has been seamless.

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Little fires eventually cause a huge one (spoilers) Reply

By: Ruth Kehinde Digital Editor

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This promotional poster for “Little Fires Everywhere,” Hulu’s new miniseries based on a bestselling book by Celeste Ng, shows the two main characters, (L-R) Elena and Mia. Photo courtesy of Hulu.com

The Hulu miniseries, “Little Fires Everywhere,” is based on the New York Times Bestseller by Celeste Ng. It was released on March 18, with a new episode released weekly. This season introduces the viewer to an upper-class family called the Richardsons while they live in the town, Shaker Heights, Ohio, which is displayed as a suburban utopia. Although this family plays a huge part, Shaker is mainly where the highlight is. The show shifts throughout the eight episodes, having Shaker be affected when introduced to Mia Warren (Kerry Washington), a bohemian, free-spirited artist, and her daughter, Pearl (Lexi Underwood) when they move into the Richardson’s family rental home. More…

Virtual Awards Banquet has unexpected positives Reply

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Photos Courtesy of the Office of Student Activities and Orientation

By Emily Long and Casey DiBari – Digital Editor and Opinion Editor

On Thursday, April 23, 2020, the Office of Student Activities and Orientation held the annual awards banquet. As a result of COVID-19 and a majority of Lasell students now residing off-campus, the awards banquet was held over Zoom. At its peak, 115 people viewed the virtual awards.  More…

News Brief: Let there be light 1

By: Ruth Kehinde-  Digital Editor 

On April 13 there was an emergency power outage across the Lasell campus, leaving all open facilities without power. According to a Residential Life campus-wide email, this storm-related incident occurred due to a downed power line and transformer damage that took place on the intersection of Woodland Road and Seminary Avenue. Residents were updated via email and were provided flashlights for the time that the power was out. Campus Police served as a Fire Watch Patrol throughout the buildings.

Lasell’s electrical power company, EverSource, provided many repairs to the damaged equipment, having the power restored only a few hours after it was shut down. Due to this unanticipated event, the registrar moved the sophomore registration period from Tuesday, April 14 to Wednesday, April 15 at 7 a.m.

 

News Brief: David Dobrik, not clickbait Reply

By Avery Stankus – Editor-in-chief

On Friday, May 1, Digital Star David Dobrik hosted a private Q&A over Zoom set up by Campus Activities Board. He and his assistant, Natalie Marideuna, repped Lasell gear while answering an abundance of questions sent in by students. 

Over 300 Lasell students joined in on the hour-long call to listen in on what he had to say. From sharing stories with celebrities to secrets about The Vlog Squad, Dobrik enthusiastically discussed that and everything in between. He also shared post-grad advice for the graduating seniors.

 “I [followed] what I loved doing. That’s what I did, I continued doing what I wanted to do. I was like I want to do something in the entertainment world and then it was luck and waiting for the right opportunity,” said Dobrik. “My dad would always say work hard…There wasn’t an opportunity for me to work hard until this opportunity presented itself: Vine. And I was like okay, this is my ticket to LA, this is where I start working hard. You just have to wait for the right opportunity.”

 

A letter to the Class of 2020: Professor Calhoun Reply

Dear Seniors,

There are times in history that can be looked at for guidance today. This has, to varying degrees, all happened before. Like now, people of the past were given the opportunity to reveal their best and worst natures. One of the most trying moments in fairly recent human history was the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918. Almost exactly 100 years ago, this pandemic took millions of lives—many in the 20 – 40 years age bracket. The world was already reeling, having just emerged from World War I, known then as the Great War (since who could have predicted there would be another), and with massive social upheaval still convulsing throughout Europe and Russia, and brewing in Asia. More…