Once a fan, now an announcer: Jack Edwards comes full circle Reply

By Taylor Viles – 1851 staff

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Jack Edwards has been the play-by-play announcer for the Boston Bruins since 2005.

 

Jack Edwards grew up in New Hampshire watching the Bruins on his TV. He heard the announcers through the screen, but never thought he’d be calling the game himself.

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Vicente runs for Dennis Simmonds Reply

By Taylor Viles1851 Staff

When the gun sounded to mark the start of the Boston Marathon on rainy Monday morning in Hopkinton, Ma., Associate Professor of Communications Erin Vicente was among the runners.

From drills with her soccer team as a child to competing with the cross country team during her senior year at Queens College in Charlotte, N.C., running has always come naturally to Vicente.

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Lasting lessons from D.C. Reply

By Emily LongContributing Writer

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Sophomore Emily Long is studying at American University this spring semester

When most people think about studying abroad, they think of exotic destinations like Australia or fulfilling a childhood dream of going to London. After all, that’s the typical study abroad experience right? Well, for the past four months I haven’t been across the world, I’ve been living and studying in our nation’s capital, Washington D.C.

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Set sail with Commander Shick Reply

Marissa Gugala- 1851 Staff

Professor Paul DeBole hosted speaker Nathanial Shick on Tuesday, April 9 in Stoller.  Shick is the commander of the U.S.S. Constitution and has been in the United States Navy for 19 years.  The U.S.S. Constitution is, as Commander Shick described her, “…a U.S. native.”  She gained her prestige and fame over the course of many naval battles, specifically the battle of 1812.

At the time of the American Revolution, on the federal level, the country did not have the shipbuilding capacity it needed.  The U.S. relied on its maritime cities such as Salem, Gloucester, Boston, and others to provide subscription frigates.  Money was raised and then the frigates were turned over to the continental congress to manage the campaign.

According to Shick, at the time the Articles of Confederation were signed, the U.S. had the second largest merchant fleet.  “Our livelihood was dependent upon the maritime trade at the time,” he said.  After the U.S. Constitution was signed, President Washington petitioned Congress in 1794 for initial funds for six frigates.  “Three which are 44-guns…and three were 36-guns.  The Constitution was one of the 44-gun ships of the time,” said Shick.

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