bocca bella offers delicious plates Reply

bocca bella café & bistro features delicious food for special occasions.
Photo courtesy of newton.patch.com

By Briana Nestor — Managing Editor

Tucked away on Lexington Street is bocca bella café & bistro, a quaint, Italian-style restaurant that offers familiar favorites for lunch and delicious, elegant entrees during the evening.

Dim lighting sets the bistro’s intimate tone and pictures of scenes from Italy adorn the muted gray and brown walls. Black fixtures hang above the tables and the bar. More…

Investigative Report: Could there be better communication with RAs? Reply

By Casey O’Brien — News Editor

Kia Rivera went to retrieve her laundry and noticed the washer had a pool of water inside, causing colors to run and ruin some of her clothes.

Why was her laundry ruined? Because the washing machine was broken.Why had nothing been done about it?

“I wrote a note to my RA because he was gone for the weekend, and later in the week, there was a note giving me a number to call. But that’s the RA’s job, not mine,” said Ri­vera, a sophomore.

The broken washer was just the tip of the iceberg. Each resident has a Resident Assistant, or RA, in their building. Residents are encouraged to go to their RAs with problems, but if they do, do their problems get fixed? Or do the residents avoid their RAs? More…

Shoeless students raise money for charity Reply

Students went barefoot for A Day Without Shoes.
Photo by Kristina Kaufmann

By Kristina Kaufmann — Layout

Students tromped around campus without shoes as part of A Day Without Shoes on April 10 in an effort to raise awareness of those who can’t afford shoes around the the world. The event was created in part by Tom’s Shoes.

“The awareness seems to have spread around cam­pus from past years,” said Ginelle Gaulin-McKenzie, MACC AmeriCorps VISTA* and participant. More…

The Celtics are back Reply

Zac Vierra — Copy Editor

With the NBA playoffs on the horizon, the Boston Celtics have as good a shot as any­one to make it to the NBA Finals.

Back at the start of the season, they were practically giving Celtics tickets away, and I was taking advantage, averaging about a game a week.

I didn’t go because I thought the Celt­ics were contenders, I went because I thought it would be the last time to see the big three play together. And every once in a while, if you caught them on a good night, they could produce a throwback performance. But most of the time they looked old.

Somehow, some way, the C’s have changed. Now they are playing like the Celtics of old. They are a force to be reckoned with and here’s why: More…

Student reads original poetry at festival Reply

By Briana Nestor — Managing Editor

For sophomore Mariana Fernandez del Castillo, writing poetry captures the world around her.

“ The entire world is constantly having new ideas… Whether the poem is completely made up, or based on the news, or [on] something someone has told me, or about myself,” said Fernandez del Castillo. “I write poetry because it is a great way of externalizing my thoughts in a way that sometimes cannot be expressed otherwise.” More…

How times have changed Reply

By Zach Gray — Sports Editor 

At the start of the new millennium, there were many questions concerning the state of the Boston Red Sox and their home field. The team wasn’t enjoying full success, as the 1999 American League Championship Series was the furthest the team had reached in nearly a decade. Ownership was consider­ing building a new stadium and demolishing the sacred ground known as Fenway Park.

Uncertainty changed to hope in 2002 when New England Sports Ventures, a group of investors including John Henry and Tom Werner purchased the historic franchise. Their plans included the renovation of Fen­way Park, increased attendance, and most importantly, a World Series title. More…

Novel powers through love, illness, strength Reply

"The Fault in Our Stars," a 2012 novel by John Green, is a beautifully crafted story of triumphing against all odds.
Photo courtesy of amazon.com

By Natalie Kfoury — A&E Editor

Time and time again, young-adult author John Green has proved that he has an amazing ability to craft heartwarming, beautiful works of literature. The Fault in Our Stars is no different. The novel, which was published in January, tackles the subject of terminal cancer patients finding hope, love, and the strength they did not believe existed.

Green introduces the reader to Hazel Grace Lancaster, a 16-year-old with terminal thyroid cancer who has been medicated by a miracle drug that will keep her alive for an indeterminable amount of time. Green tells the story from Lancaster’s eyes, making her the first female narrator that Green has written about. More…

Village resident talks science, engineering 1

Irv Gruverman, a Lasell Village resident, is a member of the Lasell College Board of Trustees and has worked in the field of science and engineering.
Photo by Morgan Brittney Austin

By Morgan Brittney Austin — 1851 Staff

“One cannot foreclose large areas of possibilities,” said Irv Gruverman, 78, a Lasell Village resident. Gruverman has encountered many opportunities in the field of science and engineering in his lifetime.

In 1963, Gruverman moved to Boston after growing up in Brooklyn, N Y. As a child, his parents taught him the values of hard work, honesty, and respect. Thanks to those values, Gruverman quickly made his way into the science field. In 1954, he graduated from The Cooper Union with a B.S. in Chemical Engineering, and in 1955, he received his M.S. from MIT in Nuclear Engineering. More…