MFA reopens amid pandemic Reply

By Katie Peters, Claire Crittendon & Rachel Shepard – Editors-in-Chief & Copy Editor

Pictures taken at the Museum of Fine Arts on October 14 in galleries “Black Histories, Black Futures” and “Women take the floor.” (for both photos)
Photos by Katie Peters.

After a six month temporary closure, The Museum of Fine Arts Boston (MFA) reopened its doors to the public on September 26, with a multitude of guidelines in place to slow the spread of COVID-19.

Political climate proves to be polarizing Reply

By Claire Crittendon, Taylor Viles, Rebecca Osowski & Rayana PetroneCo-Editor-in-Chief, Sports Editor, & 1851 Staff

The first presidential debate that took place on September 29 in Cleveland, Ohio. Graphic by Katie Peters

On September 29, President Trump and Vice President Biden took to the stage in Cleveland, Ohio for the first 2020 Presidential Debate. One week later, Vice President Pence and Senator Harris appeared live from Salt Lake City, Utah for the Vice Presidential debate.

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Editor’s Corner – Stay safe Lasers Reply

By Claire Crittendon & Katie PetersEditors-in-Chief

Katie Peters and Claire Crittendon smile underneath mask as they stand six feet apart.
Photo by Ruth Kehinde

Boston College, Harvard and Boston University: what do all these schools have in common? These universities in the Boston area all have started the school year with relatively high cases of COVID-19. According to the New York Times as of Sept 25, BC currently has 86 cases, Harvard has 43 cases and BU has 83 cases.

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Is Mulan worth the money? Reply

By Abi Brown & Claire Crittendon Arts Editor & Co-Editor-in-Chief

Disney’s 2020 live-action version of Mulan features Mulan’s harrowing journey of hiding her identity to fight in the war, rather than having the army draft her sick father. In this new version, Disney swapped the fun songs and Mushu the dragon from the 1998 original for a more dramatic and life-like movie. They used an all Asian cast, with more accurate cultural context.

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Welcome back, COVID-style Reply

By Katie Peters, Claire Crittendon & Meghan CarrollEditors-in-Chief & News Editor

September 5-8 saw the return of 720 resident and 263 commuter students to residential halls and academic buildings, according to the Registrar’s Office, unveiling the COVID-19 prepped campus. An additional 443 students are studying remotely online.

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News Briefs: September 2020 Reply

Todd Montana resigns after eight years

By Taylor Viles – Sports Editor

In late August, the Athletic Department announced on its website women’s basket- ball head coach Todd Montana was step- ping down. He held three roles with ath- letics over eight years, first hired as Sports Information Director in 2012, progressing to the role of Head Coach in 2014. On top of his basketball duties, he held the posi- tion of assistant athletic director.

Montana was the longest-serving head coach for women’s basketball. During his tenure, he racked 48 overall wins making him the winningest coach of the program.

Patriots 5th Quarter man, Bob Lobel

By Taylor Viles & Josh Wolmer – Sports Editor & 1851 Staff

On Sept. 17, Bob Lobel joined Carrie Berger’s COM231: Sports Communication class to talk about COVID-19’s effect on sports. Lobel is the host of weekly programs, Sports Final and Patriots 5th Quarter. During the class discussion, Lobel discussed the industry and some of his favorite moments from his long career. He didn’t begin his career in broadcasting until he was 26 years old, giving hope to aspiring broadcasters in college because of the head start they already have on Lobel.

The talk eventually opened up to questions from the class where Lobel made sure to emphasize the fun he had in the job. He said to never be too serious and enjoy yourself.

Campus events to address racism

By Katie Peters – Editor-in-Chief

The Donahue Institute is hosting many events this semester that focus on diversity and inclusion. Starting September 30, Director of The Donahue Institute Jesse Tauriac will be hosting monthly Diversity, Equity and Inclusion forums for community members to speak about their experiences with diversity, equity and inclusion. Participants will collaborate to create programs and initiatives that help make the community more inclusive. Other events include Latinx Heritage Month celebrations, Indegenous People’s Day and other events focusing on diversity and inclusion. For more information, contact Jesse Tauriac at jtauriac@lasell.edu or Anne Mullaney at amullaney@lasell.edu.

Friends, Family and Alumni Weekend postponed

By Claire CrittendonEditor-in-Chief

On September 17, Director of Student Activities and Orientation Jenny Granger emailed the community to state the beloved Friends, Family and Alumni Week- end will not be happening this year. Due to federal and state COVID-19 guidelines, this event has been postponed until further notices.

Student Activities is planning alternative digital programs and has hope to proceed in the Spring if possible. Updates will be delivered as necessary.

Spring semester decision deadline announced

By Katie PetersEditor-in-Chief

On September 25, President Michael Alexander sent an email to undergraduate students regarding their options of attendance for the spring semester. The only students able to study online for the spring will be those already studying online this fall. A limited number of online and commuter students may be able to move back to campus, given campus remains safe for students to reside.

Space will still be reserved for quarantine and isolation. Students who are currently studying remotely or commuting that wish to change their option for spring have until October 9 to contact The Office of Residential Life (residentiallife@lasell.edu) to request the change.

Black Lives Matter here and everywhere Reply

By Katie Peters, Claire Crittendon & Meghan CarrollEditors-in-Chief & News Editor

A Black Lives Matter sign sits in an Auburndale resident’s front yard. Photo by Katie Peters

On May 25, the death of Minneapolis resident George Floyd at the hands of then-police officer Derek Chauvin set off nationwide protests, bringing to light racial in- justice and police brutality that Black Americans face. Black Lives Matter (BLM) was established in 2013 following the deaths of two Black men killed by police, Michael Brown and Eric Garner.

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Check, please! Reply

by Claire Crittendon – Features Editor

Do you qualify for the $1,200 stimulus check? If you’re reading this, it’s unlikely. Currently, those eligible are dependents under the age of 17, who will receive $500, single adults who aren’t claimed as dependents, who will receive $1,200 and married couples, who will receive $2,400, according to the Forbes article titled, “Most College Students Won’t Get A Stimulus Check,” accessed on May 1.

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