Students celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year Reply

By Katie Peters & Madison RaffoneArts Editor & Copy Editor

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Students fill their plates with Chinese cuisine inspired by various influential Chinese chefs in Valentine Dining Hall during the Chinese New Year Celebration. Photo Courtesy of Robby Rowe. 

Students and faculty celebrated the Chinese New Year in Valentine Dining Hall on Friday, January 24 with traditional Chinese cuisine, dumpling making demonstrations and other celebratory activities. This event came one day before the actual Chinese New Year on January 25. According to the Chinese zodiac, 2020 is the year of the rat.

When swiping your torch card, there was a glass bowl of red envelopes filled with a decorative card and a fortune, a theme of red and gold was sprinkled around the dining hall. Chinese lanterns with trivia questions attached hung from the ceiling above where traditional Chinese dishes were served. Recipes inspired by influential Chinese chefs included boneless spare ribs, Chinese pork roast, and Asian beef and broccoli stir fry.

There was an array of food options, including vegan seitan steak, pepper pecans, and teriyaki mushrooms. Flyers advertising the event were posted around Arnow Campus Center and Valentine Dining Hall.

Guests were also invited to make dumplings with the instruction of senior Betty Song. She demonstrated how to carefully construct the dough pouches to be filled with either meat or vegetables. Dumplings made by guests were cooked to be enjoyed by those who made them.

Those who didn’t get the chance to make their own dumplings still had the opportunity to try some. Steamed dumplings were made and served during the lunch buffet with options of vegan and meat.

“It made me really happy to see an activity where students and professors can explore other cultures different from what they’re used to when eating at the dining hall,” said first-year Joshua Varghese after attending the event and enjoying the vegan food options.

Halsey’s junior album breaks down barriers 1

By Katie Peters Arts Editor

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Grammy Award winning artist, Halsey, on the cover of her newest album ‘Manic.” This is the third full-length studio album from the artist.

Photo Courtesy of TeenVogue.com

Halsey is back with her fluid music style and powerful voice on her third full-length album, ‘Manic,’ which was released on January 17. The 16-track record features verses from a variety of artists such as Dominic Fike, Alanis Morissette, SUGA, and BTS.

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The cost of convenience Reply

By Katie Peters – Arts Editor

Laundry is an unavoidable part of living away from home. Though it may be a small hassle and cost some money, it still has to get done at some point. The original way of paying for laundry was via the swipe of a card. Now with the new laundry system, it may just make it easier for some students to get their laundry done by eliminating the plastic cards and enabling students to pay through an app.

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Survivors of abuse take back their stories Reply

By Liv P. Fernandes & Katie Peters1851 Staff & Arts Editor

Content Warning: domestic and sexual violence

Can we cancel “Cancel Culture?” Reply

 

 

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Illustration by Robby Rowe

By Katie Peters & Madison Raffone – Arts Editor & Copy Editor

The term “cancel culture” has been popularized over the past year, referring to negative online comments when a public figure is called out on unfavorable actions.Whether it’s from their past or present, canceling a person can have harmful results. However, help- ing them grow and learn from the mistakes they have made could help.

In 2018, allegations arose against “Guardians of the Galaxy” Director James Gunn after old tweets resurfaced. The tweets included jokes about rape, pedophilia, the Holocaust, and more. Gunn claims he’s not the same man he used to be, possibly after the negative results of cancel culture.

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Chilly morning, chilling perspectives outside Winslow Reply

By Katie Peters – Arts Editor

On Thursday, Nov. 14, the hill outside of Winslow was covered in small paper flags representing “the relative percentage of survivors at Lasell University” in the context of Intimate Parter Violence. The data from the Association of American Universities annual Campus Climate Survey and the number of Lasell’s undergraduates were used to show how women, men and LGBT+ individuals on campus are affected by this issue according to the survey. This project was completed by Professor Karin Raye’s Title XI Interns and the Men’s Baseball Team.

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Outside of Winslow on Thursday, a display of flags representing the percentage of Lasell students who may report Intimate Partner Violence as an undergraduate greeted students as they walked to class.

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Newbury transfers welcomed by community Reply

By Claire Crittendon and Katie Peters– Features Editor & Katie Peters

Lasell has seen many new people around campus this semester, some are students and faculty that used to call Newbury College home. Last December, Newbury’s president announced to the community that the class of 2019 would be the last graduating class from the college, forcing students to find education elsewhere.

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