A star somewhat shines Reply

Emily Long & Pavel Zlatin1851 staff

The highly anticipated film starring Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper released on Oct. 5, “A Star is Born” is the third remake of the musical drama film released in 1937. The movie is another major role for Gaga and Cooper’s directorial debut. 

The film follows Jackson Maine (Cooper) and Ally (Gaga), two star crossed lovers who meet under unlikely yet completely cliché circumstances. Maine is a musician plagued by alcohol and substance addiction. After performing in Los Angeles, he meets Ally as she performs “La Vie en Rose” in an obscure bar. The pair get drunk and Ally sings one of her original songs to Maine. Her talent strikes him immediately, leading him to introduce her to the music world. As Ally’s career progresses, Maine is further ravaged by his inner demons. 

The duo’s acting is nothing but fantastic. Cooper has fully embodied the persona of Maine, a rugged Arizona cowboy. Gaga allows Ally to grow throughout the film from timid performer to a full-fledged starlet. 

The clear star of the movie is the soundtrack. Gaga’s vocals are a powerhouse with her edition of “La Vie en Rose”. The film showcases how well Gaga performs in a variety of styles from ballads with Cooper to pop songs similar to Gaga’s personal style. Cooper’s music talent is reminiscent of classic rock. 

While most of the elements of the film are great, the plot of the movie is awkward, paced too  quickly, and cliché. Luckily, as clumsy as the plot is, it is not bad enough to ruin all the good things about the movie. The original film also had a clumsy plot line, forgiving that particular flaw. 

Overall, “A Star is Born” is a movie worth seeing. The acting is incredible, the soundtrack is simply beautiful, and Gaga has proved once again that she can do it all.

“Venom” lacks a clean bite Reply

Colin Froment & Brian CohenCo-editor-in-chief & 1851 staff

Spider-Man supervillain Venom swings back into cinemas in his self-titled film, “Venom,” released on Oct. 6. The film highlights the character’s anti-hero persona on a path of redemption in a film separate from any Marvel film released. 

Investigative journalist Eddie Brock (Tom Hardy) attempts to revamp his career by investigating the Life Foundation and its sinister founder, Carlton Drake (Riz Ahmed). This causes him to be forcibly bonded with the alien symbiote Venom, giving him superhuman strength, shapeshifting abilities and a constant hunger for human beings. Brock must learn to find the balance between his morals and the symbiote’s cannibalistic intentions in order to take down the Life Foundation. 

And the film does get as interesting as it sounds – for the most part. 

“Venom” really struggled with pacing. The first half of the film is a large, dull exposition that takes a slow approach focusing on Brock, making fans wait what seems like forever for him to actually become Venom. Once the symbiote finally emerges, there is more excitement to witness, but then the movie feels rushed as it progresses. As the predictable climax comes to a close, the audience is left thinking, “wait, that’s it?” 

The film left little time for character development for the supporting cast. Drake is about as generic as it gets when it comes to devious corporation CEOs, even when attached to the murderous symbiote, Riot. Michele Williams as Anne Weying had stand out moments that set her apart from other superhero love interests, but it doesn’t completely make up for some personality flaws she displays in the beginning of the film. 

On a less darker side, Hardy proves to be the perfect choice as both Brock and Venom, mixing two very distinct personalities into one character with such ease. The monster unleashes brutal action scenes and displays signature dark humor to create the film’s funniest moments. With a visually striking and frightening appearance, thanks to detailed visual effects, Venom looks ripped straight out of the comic pages for enjoyment.

With a rushed plot that begins at a snail’s pace and dull characters, “Venom” feels like an unfinished product but with a little glimmer of a potentially fun flick. “Venom” is like Play-Doh, a messy but entertaining pile of goop that kids might not want to eat a second time around.

Anything but simple Reply

Pavel Zlatin — 1851 Staff

Anna Kendrick is a primary female lead for “A Simple Favor”. Photo courtesy of Live For Films 

A family, a house in the suburbs, a high-profile PR job, brilliant bartending  skills  and  an  excessive  collection  of  Louboutins.  Everything about  Emily  (Blake  Lively)  seems  to  be  absolutely  perfect,  unless  you  make  the  mistake  of  becoming  her  friend– the  mistake  Stephanie  (Anna  Kendrick)  did.

More…

“A Quiet Place” makes noise at box office Reply

By Danielle Hogan – Arts Editor

“A Quiet Place” was written and directed by “The Office” star John Krasinski, who also starred in the film. 

Characters played by himself and his real-life wife, Emily Blunt, raise three kids in a post-alien apocalypse. Their eldest child, played by Millicent Simmonds, is deaf. Because of this, the family is well-versed in sign language. The alien creatures don’t have eyes; they have strong hearing that can detect any loud sound. Therefore, the family moves slowly and tiptoes everywhere that isn’t white sand laid down to muffle their footsteps.

Screen Shot 2018-04-26 at 1.33.23 PM.png

“A Quiet Place,” released Friday, April 6, had the second best domestic debut of 2018. Photo courtesy of IMDB

More…

All hail the king Reply

By Colin Froment & Justin Fosdick – News Editor & 1851 Staff

The film “Black Panther” was highly anticipated not just by Marvel fans, but also by the general public for highlighting one of the most racially diverse casts in a recent movie. This cast serves as one of the film’s main strengths, while combing dazzling visuals and underlying political themes to provide another entertaining superhero adventure.  More…

Hanks, Streep deliver in “The Post” Reply

By Leanne Signoriello & Alex Balletto – Features Editor & Copy Editor

Steven Spielberg and his star-studded cast in “The Post” allow audiences to accurately revisit tumultuous 1971. “The Post” focused on the publication of U.S. Pentagon papers, exposing the secrets that the federal government lied to citizens about the Vietnam War, leading to the Watergate scandal. More…

Siege of Jadotville is another Netflix classic Reply

By Tim Kelleher – 1851 Staff

The Siege of Jadotville is an underdog story. This Netflix Original movie is based on a true story that took place in September of 1961 in the Katanga Province of the Democratic-Republic of the Congo. I’ll start with summarizing the actual events. In real life, there was a large mercenary group that was working for the seceded State of Katanga. The state of Katanga seceded from the DR Congo in 1960 and had become fairly aggressive around its surrounding states. The United Nations had decided to send in Swedish, Indian and most notably, Irish forces to keep the region stable but not to get involved by any means necessary, engaging only if absolutely needed. The Irish troops are the featured ones in this movie.

More…

“The Girl on the Train” novel outshines the film Reply

By Karlee Henry – 1851 Staff

At its October 7 premiere, “The Girl on the Train” was thought to be the next “Gone Girl,” but fans of the latter film and the novel of the same name could be in for disappointment. Unfortunately, the film is certainly no “Gone Girl,” but Emily Blunt’s compelling performance of Rachel Watson keeps this train on the tracks.

More…